The Romper Room Effect

Posted on 28. Jan, 2011 by in Blog, Leadership and Development

In 1952, a new “kiddie learning show” show was launchedRomper Room.  Syndicated across the country and shown in England, Ireland, Japan and Australia, the show provided a much needed ‘time out’ for weary parents as their children sat, eyes glued to the TV.  The preschoolers interacted with their televisions, audibly answering  questions when asked such as, “Did you know the horse was brown?”

Tiny squirming children would wait  patiently (or not so patiently) for the highlight of the show, the closing scene where Miss Nancy (the original host out of Baltimore)

or Miss Debbie, Miss Susan, Miss Sally, etc. would position her magic mirror in front of her face, look directly into the camera, and recite  the names of  the good boys and girls she could see that day.

Some children would jump up and down in front of the TV, attempting to get Miss Whoever’s  attention as the roll call began,

“I see Sarah, I see Bobby, I see Suzie…”  And 40 years later , “I see Michelle, I see Tiffany, I see Tyler, I see Brandy” – you get the idea.

(Nope – I never heard Denise. -Ahh the agony!)

Which, years later leads us to the Romper Room Effect in leadership.

As a leader, how many times have you had the opportunity to hold up the magic mirror?  A way to see people that are doing good things, just waiting to be noticed?

That employee wanting you to notice  he is doing a good job.  That volunteer wanting you to recognize  the hours she is putting in makes a difference.

Did you see him/her? Did you offer a thank you? A “good job” comment?

The recent Bureau of Labor Statistics report  indicates that the number of people leaving their jobs, not affected by a layoff is up by 6%.

Up in an otherwise down economy.  Why? Many cite their boss as a primary reason for exit, along with lack of opportunity for contribution, or loss of confidence in senior management.

Most reasons for leaving are concerns about how they are viewed, treated – noticed.  [note: compensation is hardly ever noted as the reason to leave.]

What about you? As a leader, do you see and value the people vying for your attention??

If not, perhaps it’s time to look in the mirror.

Walls

Posted on 07. May, 2010 by in Blog, Change Management, Leadership and Development

Four walls (room) – to protect what’s in and keep out – well, what’s out.

Break Through!

Break Through!

Wailing Wall – a place to seek, mourn, and pray.

Great wall of China – way to define large borders.

THE WALL – of Fenway Park – a place to target when batting it up with the

Boston Red Soxs

We are good at walls. We are even better using terms involving walls for organizational analogies: Building walls, scaling walls, climbing walls.

“Tear down that wall Mr. Gorbachev.” -Ronald Reagan

For change-leaders creating momentum, reinventing, moving people to new places – challenging and frustrating moments encountered can be when you……..

HIT THE WALL!

When something  smacks you to a dead stop. An obstacle seems insurmountable. Difficult.  Walking away seems better than moving forward.

What is a Change leader to do?

1. Acknowledge.

The wall is a temporary derailment. Hitting a wall doesn’t change anything.  The original challenge is still in play, has to be dealt with, and you are still the one to make it happen.

In order to tame it, you have to name it. It’s just a wall.

2. Personal Choice Moment

You have to decide it you’d prefer to:

A. Jump over it

B. Climb it

C. Walk around it

All methods work. After all, while potentially large, it’s just a wall.

3. Setbacks ≠ Stop

Setbacks or new obstacles don’t indicate that the original change is no longer needed. Newly discovered impediments are just incremental obstacles that were not originally uncovered in the analysis. Once removed, better for all in the long term. Include the setback into the plan and keep moving forward. If a personal setback, what did you learn, how can you use it as growth experience?

Don’t give up – keep going!!

Good Luck!